PADS

 

Pet Affordable Dentistry and Surgery (PADS)

This is a program initially designed and begun in late 2014  to provide needed surgical or dental care for pets who may otherwise be unable to receive it due to financial reasons.  We wanted  to use our helping hands to allow people to take care of their furry friends.  We were so gratified with the results of the program and the many pets and their owners that we have helped, that we have decided to completely devote our practice to this. We are often asked how we can provide these services for fees so much lower than other hospitals.  We offer two responses:  1. We remember why we got into this profession in the first place, and it wasn't  to make money.  There are many easier ways to do that.  We want to help animals.  We help hundreds of pets yearly that would either be euthanized or suffer with treatable disease solely due to financial reasons.   2. By not providing other services and selling flea medications, pet food, shampoos, etc., our operating expenses are lower.

The goal of this program is to provide high-quality, yet affordable surgical and dental care for your pet.  We utilize an Accuvet CO2 laser to perform our surgical procedures.  The laser provides greater precision and less pain, bleeding, and swelling than a scalpel.  Please see below a list of common surgical and dental procedures that we perform.  For the sake of simplicity, all costs are included in the fee which covers necessary sedatives, anesthetics, anesthetic monitoring costs, surgical supplies, laser use, antibiotics, and take-home pain medications. The fee also includes a consultation and patient examination.  Patients are treated on an outpatient basis, being admitted early in the morning, and most often sent home with you after anesthetic recovery in the late-morning or afternoon.  Patients are encouraged to have pre-anesthetic laboratory testing done by your veterinarian.  This is especially recommended for patients over seven years of age.  If a patient has been referred to us and has recent blood work results, please bring them with you.  There will be no other additional fees.  Full payment for the procedure is required at time of admission.  We accept cash, check, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, and CareCredit.  Since surgical and dental procedures take considerable time, it is imperative that we be notified as soon as possible if you will be unable to make an appointment, so that other patients may be scheduled. **** Missed appointments will not be re-scheduled if such notice is not given.****

Since these fees are considerably less than what is generally charged in veterinary hospitals, we will not provide any other routine, preventative health care,  or non-surgical/dental procedures such as vaccinations, or elective surgeries such as neuters, spays, and declaws.  If another veterinarian has referred you to us, you will be sent back to them for any needed follow-up care, unless any immediate, post-operative complications arise.  In this unlikely event, we will treat the same at no additional charge.  Our goal is not to "steal" clients from other veterinary practices, but to provide care to patients that would otherwise receive no care or be euthanized due to financial reasons.  Again, routine, elective procedures such as spays, neuters, and declaws will not be provided under this program.  If a procedure is done to treat neoplasia (cancer) or if neoplasia is suspected, a biopsy will be submitted to the laboratory to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate completeness of excision. This will be an additional cost of $135.

***Laser Therapy***

Many patients will benefit greatly from being treated with our Class IV,  K-Laser therapy unit after surgery.  It helps to reduce pain, swelling, and speeds healing and recovery.  Treatments only take a few minutes and are done every 2-3 days after surgery for about 1- 2 weeks.  If you are interested in this, please inquire.  There will be an additional charge of $75 for this service.

Procedures/Fees

ABSCESS TREATMENT (lance, debride and flush;  place drains if needed) $325

AMPUTATION OF LEG CANINE   $700 less than 30 lbs.,  $875  30-50 lbs.  Patients larger than this would probably better be treated by a surgical specialist, with aftercare provided at a critical care facility.  We recommend having a Fentanyl patch (pain medication) applied the day before surgery.  We do not have these, but most emergency clinics do.   We can do larger patients, but please call to inquire.

AMPUTATION OF LEG FELINE    $700

AMPUTATION OF TAIL                 $500

AMPUTATION OF DIGIT (TOE)    $325

AURAL (EAR FLAP) HEMATOMA $400

BLOAT (GASTRIC DILATATION/VOLVULUS)  decompress stomach, de-rotate, and perform gastropexy  $975

CAESAREAN SECTION  $725 without spay, $775 with spay

CHELIOPLASTY (lip fold surgery) $375

CHERRY EYE (Prolapsed third eyelid gland)  $315 one eye, $425 both eyes.  We use our CO2 laser to create a pouch and replace the gland into the pouch.  This preserves tear production from the gland to prevent KCS (dry eye) in the future.  This procedure has about a 10-20% failure rate where the gland re-prolapses.  If this occurs, an ophthalmology specialist will be needed to do a more advanced procedure called orbital tacking.

CHOLECYSTECTOMY  (removal of gall bladder for chronic infection; not for biliary obstruction)  $850

*****CRANIAL CRUCIATE LIGAMENT SURGERY-SEE BOTTOM OF PAGE*****

CRANIAL CRUCIATE LIGAMENT STABILIZATION USING LATERAL SUTURE TECHNIQUE  $1000--- using the LigaFiba suture material.  LigaFiba is a new, extremely strong surgical suture material.  It is composed entirely of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE).  Weight for weight, it is 15 times stronger than steel and 2.5 times stronger than nylon.

This suture is much stronger, more durable, and more resistant to abrasion than the nylon suture or nylon leader-line  "fishing line suture" used in the past.  It is suitable for dogs of all weights.

      *We do not perform the TPLO or TTA procedures for treating cruciate ligament rupture.

CYSTOTOMY (OPENING THE URINARY BLADDER TO REMOVE STONES OR GROWTHS)  $745 cats and female dogs, $800 male dogs.   (If an urethrostomy is also needed $900 total)       (Includes follow-up x-Ray)--- (Stone analysis to determine type recommended-- $165 additional)

DENTAL SCALING AND POLISHING  $240 routine.  $285  if simple extractions are needed, up to $500 if numerous/complex extractions are needed.  Cats with severe stomatitis needing full-mouth extractions $600

ELONGATED SOFT PALATE RESECTION $325

ENUCLEATION (eye removal)   $395 (cats and dogs less than 30 lbs.).  $435 (dogs over 30 lbs.).

ENTROPION/ECTROPION REPAIR (per eyelid) $240

ESOPHAGEAL FEEDING TUBE PLACEMENT $140

EXPLORATORY LAPAROTOMY  (dependent on condition $450-$975)

FEMORAL HEAD AND NECK EXCISION (FHO) $875

GASTROINTESTINAL FOREIGN BODY REMOVAL (simple) $900--- If intestinal resection/anastomosis or multiple incisions into stomach and/or intestines are necessary, $1000

SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL - LARGE  (3 or more inches) $600-$900--- depending on complexity*

SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL - MEDIUM (1-3 inches) $385*

SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL - SMALL (less than 1 inch) $175*

*THESE SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL FEES ARE ESTIMATIONS, AND MAY CHANGE DEPENDING ON LOCATION, INVASIVENESS OF GROWTH AND DIFFICULTY INVOLVED IN EXCISION.  AN EXAMINATION WILL BE NEEDED TO PROVIDE A DEFINITE FEE AMOUNT.

HERNIA REPAIR -  INGUINAL $545;  UMBILICAL $295

INTUSSUSCEPTION $645 (simple) --- If intestinal resection/anastomosis is needed, $975

MASTECTOMY - SIMPLE/LUMPECTOMY $485; RADICAL $800

MEDIAL PATELLAR LUXATION  STABILIZATION $850-$1100--- Depending on which and how many procedures are required---  (Grades 1-3) ---There are usually multiple anatomic abnormalities that cause this complex condition.  There are several different procedures that are necessary to correct these.  We are able to do most of these.  However, some dogs, especially larger breeds, have an inward curvature of the end of the femur (thigh bone) which must be corrected by cutting the bone (a corrective osteotomy), re-positioned, and stabilized with a bone plate.  We do not have the equipment to do this.  For this reason, radiographs are required to assess each case to determine if we can do surgery.

NASAL SKIN FOLD EXCISION $525

NEPHRECTOMY (kidney removal) $875

NEUTER (cryptorchid)  $275 INGUINAL  $475 ABDOMINAL

PERINEAL URETHROSTOMY IN CATS $900

PYOMETRA (infected uterus)  OVARIOHYSTERECTOMY  $570 (FELINE/CANINE LESS THAN 30 LBS.)  $800 (CANINE OVER 30 LBS.)

RECTAL PROLAPSE REPAIR $475 for colopexy;  $650 if prolapse amputation is also required

SPLENECTOMY $875

STENOTIC NARES RESECTION using laser $300

URETHROSTOMY TO TREAT URINARY OBSTRUCTION (CANINE)---Cystotomy included if needed  $900

VULVAR  SKIN FOLD RESECTION (removal of excess skin around vulva to prevent recurrent urinary tract infections) $525

WOUND/LACERATION REPAIR (varies depending on size, location, and duration) $150 for small, fresh wound to $800 for complex, large, or infected wounds.

*****Cranial Cruciate Ligament Surgery*****

Surgical procedures performed to treat cruciate ligament injuries are generally one of the following:

1.      Osteotomy techniques such as the TPLO or TTA procedures where a portion of the tibia bone is cut and repositioned with bone plates  in order to stabilize the knee joint.  These procedures are very effective, but are more invasive, require more equipment, and are considerably more expensive.  Complications can be potentially severe since bone is cut and repositioned with plates and screws that may fail, or the bone not heal.  We do not perform these procedures.

2.      Extracapsular (outside of the joint) repair techniques where either strong nylon sutures, fiber tape, Ligafiba suture, or the Orthozip fiber are implanted to replace the function of the torn cruciate ligament and stabilize the knee while the injured joint heals.  Complications are mainly implant infection or breakage in approximately 5% of cases.  These are the procedures we do.

3.      Intracapsular (inside the joint) repairs using various graft techniques; not done as often today as in the past.

Many studies show about an 85-90% success rate, regardless of procedure performed.  As a general rule, very large dogs or very active dogs will probably do better with an osteotomy procedure.  Also, dogs with chronic injuries often have significant degenerative and arthritic changes in the knee that will reduce the likelihood of an optimal recovery, regardless of which procedure is done.  It is important with any cruciate surgery to remove the remnants of the damaged ligament and to inspect the menisci  (wedges of cartilage between the femur and tibia that act as shock absorbers)  in the joint for damage and to remove any damaged portions as they cannot heal and cause pain.

Not every dog is a candidate for the extracapsular techniques.  We use several factors to judge if our techniques are suitable for a given patient.  Three of these are body weight, amount of arthritis or degenerative joint disease present, and your dog’s particular anatomy.  Some dogs have a very pronounced downward sloping of the back top of the tibia or shin bone, which causes the force of weight-bearing, especially in a large dog, to cause greater mechanical force being directed forwards, something called "tibial thrust",  instead of down toward the ground, which places much greater force on the implanted materials during walking and running, and this increases the potential for the implants to break or fail.  It is important for us to be able to evaluate the degree of degenerative changes and the shape of the tibia.   All we need is a good-quality lateral radiograph of the leg.  If your veterinarian has taken radiographs, please have them sent to us via email or bring them with you. If there are advanced degenerative changes present, or a pronounced sloping of the top of the tibia (an abnormally large tibia plateau angle-TPA) exists, especially in a large dog, it may be advisable not to proceed with surgery, as these patients will likely do better with an osteotomy technique.  With all this being said, we realize that our PADS program may be the only option for some pets that are in constant pain.  We have done hundreds of cruciate ligament surgeries and generally have very good results.  We will evaluate each patient and make our best recommendations.

For conditions not listed, please call the office to inquire.

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  • "Dr. Savell has always gone above and beyond for the care of our family's pets for several years."
    John Doe Newport News, VA

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