PADS

 

Pet Affordable Dentistry and Surgery (PADS)

This is a program initially designed and begun in late 2014  to provide needed surgical or dental care for pets who may otherwise be unable to receive it due to financial reasons.  We wanted  to use our helping hands to allow people to take care of their furry friends.  We were so gratified with the results of the program and the many pets and their owners that we have helped, that we have decided to completely devote our practice to this. We are often asked how we can provide these services for fees so much lower than other hospitals.  We offer two responses:  1. We remember why we got into this profession in the first place, and it wasn't  to make money.  There are many easier ways to do that.  We want to help animals.  We help hundreds of pets yearly that would either be euthanized or suffer with treatable disease solely due to financial reasons.   2. By not providing other services and selling flea medications, pet food, shampoos, etc., our operating expenses are lower.

The goal of this program is to provide high-quality, yet affordable surgical and dental care for your pet.  We utilize an Accuvet CO2 laser to perform many of our surgical procedures.  The laser provides greater precision and less pain, bleeding, and swelling than a scalpel.  Please see below a list of common surgical and dental procedures that we perform.  For the sake of simplicity, all costs are included in the fee which covers necessary sedatives, anesthetics, anesthetic monitoring costs, surgical supplies, laser use, antibiotics, and take-home pain medications. The fee also includes a consultation and patient examination.  If the doctor recommends an Elizabethan collar to protect the surgery site, there will be an additional $15 charge for this.  If you have your own, or wish to purchase one elsewhere, please let us know beforehand.  Patients are treated on an outpatient basis, being admitted early in the morning, and most often sent home with you after anesthetic recovery in the late-morning or afternoon.  Patients are encouraged to have pre-anesthetic laboratory testing done by your veterinarian.  This is especially recommended for patients over seven years of age.  If a patient has been referred to us and has recent blood work results, please bring them with you.  There will be no other additional fees.  Full payment for the procedure is required at time of admission.  We accept cash, check, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, and CareCredit.  Since surgical and dental procedures take considerable time, it is imperative that we be notified as soon as possible if you will be unable to make an appointment, so that other patients may be scheduled. **** Missed appointments will not be re-scheduled if such notice is not given.****

Since these fees are considerably less than what is generally charged in veterinary hospitals, we will not provide any other routine, preventative health care,  or non-surgical/dental procedures such as vaccinations, or elective surgeries such as neuters, spays, and declaws.  If another veterinarian has referred you to us, you will be sent back to them for any needed follow-up care, unless any immediate, post-operative complications arise.  In this unlikely event, we will treat the same at no additional charge.  Our goal is not to "steal" clients from other veterinary practices, but to provide care to patients that would otherwise receive no care or be euthanized due to financial reasons.  Again, routine, elective procedures such as spays, neuters, and declaws will not be provided under this program.  If a procedure is done to treat neoplasia (cancer) or if neoplasia is suspected, a biopsy will be submitted to the laboratory to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate completeness of excision. This will be an additional cost of $180.

***Laser Therapy***

Many patients will benefit greatly from being treated with our Class IV,  K-Laser therapy unit after surgery.  It helps to reduce pain, swelling, and speeds healing and recovery.  Treatments only take a few minutes and are done every 2-3 days after surgery for about 1- 2 weeks.  If you are interested in this, please inquire.  There will be an additional charge of $75 for this service.

Procedures/Fees

ABSCESS TREATMENT (lance, debride and flush;  place drains if needed) $250-$375

AMPUTATION OF TAIL                 $375 - $450 depending on size of pet

AMPUTATION OF DIGIT (TOE)    $400

AURAL (EAR FLAP) HEMATOMA  $400

CAESAREAN SECTION  $775 without spay, $825 with spay

CHELIOPLASTY (lip fold surgery) $375

CHERRY EYE (Prolapsed third eyelid gland)  $425 one eye, $475 both eyes.  We use our CO2 laser to create a pouch and replace the gland into the pouch.  This preserves tear production from the gland to prevent KCS (dry eye) in the future.  This procedure has about a 10-20% failure rate where the gland re-prolapses.  If this occurs, an ophthalmology specialist will be needed to do a more advanced procedure called orbital tacking.

                  *****CRANIAL CRUCIATE LIGAMENT SURGERY-SEE BOTTOM OF PAGE*****

CRANIAL CRUCIATE LIGAMENT STABILIZATION USING LATERAL SUTURE TECHNIQUE  $1125

      *We do not perform either the TPLO or TTA procedures for treating cruciate ligament rupture.

CYSTOTOMY (OPENING THE URINARY BLADDER TO REMOVE STONES OR GROWTHS)  $800 cats and female dogs, $825 male dogs.   (If an urethrostomy is also needed $1250 total)       (Includes follow-up x-Ray)--- (Stone analysis to determine type recommended-- $165 additional)

DENTAL SCALING AND POLISHING  $300 routine.  $325  if simple extractions are needed, up to $500 if numerous/complex extractions are needed.  Please see the following concerning dental radiography.  We realize that without our PADS program, many pets needing dentistry work will go un-treated, and we will still offer the cleaning, polishing, and extraction of any obviously diseased, painful, and infected teeth at these fees.  Unfortunately, although we do everything that we can to properly treat all visible dental disease, we may not be able to recognize significant disease without radiography.

NEW!  DENTISTRY CARE WITH FULL-MOUTH DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY $500-$800.     The use of intra-oral dental radiography (X-rays) allows us to detect dental disease below the gum line that may be causing pain in your pet that is not detectable by visible examination.  Studies have shown that 20-50% or more pets have painful dental disease that is not detectable without dental radiography.  Anyone that goes to their personal  dentist can expect dental X-Rays.  It increases our ability to properly treat all diseased teeth, it increases the safety of  potentially dangerous dental extractions that might cause jaw fracture due to severe bone loss around the tooth caused by disease that can’t be seen without radiography, and helps ensure that tooth extractions are necessary and complete.  We will call you with an estimate on what we consider necessary following what we see on the radiographs.  Unfortunately, since pets won’t sit still with radiography sensors in their mouths, they will have to be anesthetized for this. Also please realize, that we do not extract teeth without significant disease.  It takes more time and effort, and is more costly to us when extractions are necessary,  but it can make a real difference in the quality of life and health for your pet.  Currently, the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Veterinary Dental College, the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, and the American Animal Hospital Association all consider the use of dental radiography the standard of care when performing dentistry procedures today.  We are one of the few area hospitals that have invested in the equipment to be able to provide this, and we are proud to be able to offer the best dental care that we can. Also, please recognize that although we necessarily have higher fees for this service, the equipment we use is quite expensive, it takes a considerable amount more time and effort to perform the radiographs and to deal with additional disease not visible without radiography,  but it allows us to better identify and treat painful disease in your pet.  For more information, please see the dental radiography article page on the homepage.

ELONGATED SOFT PALATE RESECTION $425 (OFTEN DONE IN ADDITION TO STENOTIC NARES ENLARGEMENT TO TREAT BRACHYCEPALIC SYNDROME---IF NECESSARY, TOTAL FEE $725).

ENUCLEATION (eye removal)   $425 (cats and dogs less than 30 lbs.).  $475 (dogs over 30 lbs.).

ENTROPION/ECTROPION REPAIR (per eyelid) $275

ESOPHAGEAL FEEDING TUBE PLACEMENT $165

EXPLORATORY LAPAROTOMY  (dependent on condition $450-$975)

EYELID MASS REMOVAL  $375

FEMORAL HEAD AND NECK EXCISION (FHO) $975

GASTROINTESTINAL FOREIGN BODY REMOVAL (simple) $950--- If intestinal resection/anastomosis or multiple incisions into stomach and/or intestines are necessary, $1125

SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL - LARGE  (3 or more inches) $625---$1500 depending on complexity, size. and location*

SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL - MEDIUM (1-3 inches) $575*

SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL - SMALL (less than 1 inch) $325*

*THESE SKIN GROWTH REMOVAL FEES ARE ESTIMATIONS, AND MAY CHANGE DEPENDING ON LOCATION, INVASIVENESS OF GROWTH AND DIFFICULTY INVOLVED IN EXCISION.  AN EXAMINATION WILL BE NEEDED TO PROVIDE A DEFINITE FEE AMOUNT.

HERNIA REPAIR -  INGUINAL $600;  UMBILICAL $295

INTUSSUSCEPTION $745 (simple) --- If intestinal resection/anastomosis is needed, $1125

MASTECTOMY - SIMPLE/LUMPECTOMY $525; RADICAL (INVOLVING MULTIPLE GLANDS) $900-$1200, depending on patient size and number of glands involved.

MEDIAL PATELLAR LUXATION  STABILIZATION $975-$1125--- Depending on which and how many procedures are required---  (Grades 1-3) ---There are usually multiple anatomic abnormalities that cause this complex condition.  There are several different procedures that are necessary to correct these.  We are able to do most of these.  However, some dogs, especially larger breeds, have an inward curvature of the end of the femur (thigh bone) which must be corrected by cutting the bone (a corrective osteotomy), re-positioned, and stabilized with a bone plate.  We do not have the equipment to do this.  For this reason, radiographs are required to assess each case to determine if we can do surgery.  Some pets with this condition also have an injury to the cranial cruciate ligament as well.  We inspect all of the structures of the knee, and if there is injury to this ligament as well, there will be an additional fee of $200 to treat it.

NASAL SKIN FOLD EXCISION $525

NEUTER (cryptorchid)  $250 INGUINAL  $375 ABDOMINAL

PYOMETRA (infected uterus)  OVARIOHYSTERECTOMY  $500 (FELINE/CANINE LESS THAN 30 LBS.)  $750 (CANINE OVER 30 LBS.)

RECTAL PROLAPSE REPAIR $600 for colopexy;  $850 if prolapse amputation is also required

SPLENECTOMY $925

STENOTIC NARES RESECTION using laser $300 (OFTEN DONE IN ADDITION WITH ELONGATED SOFT PALATE RESECTION TO TREAT BRACHYCEPHALIC SYNDROME---IF NECCESARY, TOTAL FEE IS $725).

URETHROSTOMY TO TREAT URINARY OBSTRUCTION (CANINE)---Cystotomy included if needed  $1150

WOUND/LACERATION REPAIR (varies depending on size, location, and duration) $150 for small, fresh wound to $800 for complex, large, or infected wounds.

*****Cranial Cruciate Ligament Surgery*****

Surgical procedures performed to treat cruciate ligament injuries are generally one of the following:

1.      Osteotomy techniques such as the TPLO or TTA procedures where a portion of the tibia bone is cut and repositioned with bone plates  in order to stabilize the knee joint.  These procedures are very effective, but are more invasive, require more equipment, and are considerably more expensive.  Complications can be potentially severe since bone is cut and repositioned with plates and screws that may fail, or the bone not heal.  We do not perform these procedures.

2.      Extracapsular (outside of the joint) repair techniques where either strong nylon sutures, fiber tape, or other materials are implanted to replace the function of the torn cruciate ligament and stabilize the knee while the injured joint heals.  Complications are mainly implant infection or breakage in approximately 5% of cases.  These are the procedures we do.

3.      Intracapsular (inside the joint) repairs using various graft techniques; not done as often today as in the past.

Many studies show about an 85-90% success rate, regardless of procedure performed.  As a general rule, very large dogs or very active dogs will probably do better with an osteotomy procedure.  Also, dogs with chronic injuries often have significant degenerative and arthritic changes in the knee that will reduce the likelihood of an optimal recovery, regardless of which procedure is done.  It is important with any cruciate surgery to remove the remnants of the damaged ligament and to inspect the menisci  (wedges of cartilage between the femur and tibia that act as shock absorbers)  in the joint for damage and to remove any damaged portions as they cannot heal and cause pain.

Not every dog is a candidate for the extracapsular techniques.  We use several factors to judge if our techniques are suitable for a given patient.  Some of these are body weight, age, level of expected activity, duration of the injury, amount of arthritis or degenerative joint disease present, and your dog’s particular anatomy.  Radiographs (X-rays) of the knee are helpful, and are suggested to be provided to determine whether your pet is a good candidate for the procedures that we perform.  We evaluate every patient on a case by case basis, and will give our best recommendations.


Here is a link to the ACVS Website with more information about this condition:

https://www.acvs.org/small-animal/cranial-cruciate-ligament-disease

For conditions not listed, please call the office to inquire.

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